Monthly Archives: November 2014

‘She Is a Cancer’: Blaze Readers React to Ferguson Column Penned By Ivy League Professor That’s Being Called ‘Shameful’

“Evidently they hand out Ivy League professorships these days like they’re candy or Nobel prizes.”

Posted in Conservative thoughts

Thanksgiving Day Store Traffic Up 27 Percent as Retailers Cut into Holiday

Retailers’ decision to move up many holiday sales to Thanksgiving Day resulted in a 27.3% jump in store traffic over last year’s Thanksgiving Day numbers, reports retail analytics firm ShopperTrak.  “It’s ruining the spirit of Thanksgiving,”…

Posted in Conservative thoughts

Ray Rice’s Wife on NFL Commissioner: ‘I Can’t Say He’s Telling the Truth’

“I knew that our relationship wouldn’t be over because I know that this isn’t us, and it’s not him.”

Posted in Conservative thoughts

Open thread for night owls: New energy is transforming cities into centers of progressive innovation

Solar rooftops

Sarah van Gelder at Yes! magazine writes New energy is transforming our cities into hotbeds of democracy and progressive innovation.

If you’ve been looking to the federal government for action on big challenges such as poverty, climate change, and immigration, this has been a devastating decade. Big money’s dominance of elections, obstructionism by the Tea Party, and climate denial have brought action in Washington to a near standstill. But while the media focuses on the gridlock, a more hopeful story is unfolding. Cities are taking action. [...]

While Congress debates whether climate change is a vast left-wing conspiracy, Houston is spending $200 million to restore wetland ecosystems in anticipation of increased flooding. The 4,000-acre Bayou Greenways project will absorb and cleanse floodwater while creating space for trails and outdoor recreation.

“Houston’s best defense against extreme climate events and natural disasters is grounded in its local efforts to leverage … its bayous, marshes and wetlands,” Houston Mayor Annise Parker said in a press release.

In Philadelphia, if you look up while waiting for a bus, you might find you are standing under a living roof. Philadelphia is dealing with excessive storm water runoff by encouraging rain gardens, green roofs—large and small—and absorbent streets that allow water to soak through into the soil.

Given the threat posed by runaway climate change, one would expect ambitious national and international action to reduce greenhouse pollution. But cities are out in front, taking action to reduce their own climate impacts with or without federal support. From New York to Seattle, cities are adopting efficient building standards, taxing carbon, switching to energy-efficient street lighting, promoting local food, and financing building-scale conversion to solar energy.

Cities are responsible for a new surge in bicycling, not just on the crunchy West Coast, but in old industrial cities. In September, Bicycling Magazine named New York the number-one U.S. city for bicycling, noting its hundreds of miles of bike lanes, ambitious bike-share program, and long-term commitment to cycling. “One million more people will come to New York City by 2030, and there’s simply going to be no more room for cars,” Janette Sadik-Khan, commissioner of the Department of Transportation, told Bicycling.

Chicago, named number two, is set to meet its goal of creating 100 miles of protected bike lanes by 2015, and it will soon have the nation’s largest bike-share program.

These developments are in part thanks to enlightened city officials, including those looking for low-cost ways to attract young, entrepreneurial residents.

But cities are getting more bike-friendly in large part because of persistent pressure by activists. [...]


Blast from the Past. At Daily Kos on this date in 2013This would be a scandal, but only if it were true:

The claim: According to House Government Oversight Committee Chairman Darrell Issa, in order to meet the October 1 deadline for launching healthcare.gov, the Obama administration ignored security issues with the website, risking the disclosure of personally identifiable information from people applying for insurance—and even worse, they concealed a memo about this information from key technical staff.

The reality: The memo had nothing to do with the October 1 launch of healthcare.gov. It concerned a component of the website that is not planned to launch until April 2014 and would only be used by insurance companies to supply information about their plans to the health care exchanges. The reason key technical staff did not see the memo was that it was not relevant to them, had no bearing on the October 1 launch, and had nothing to do with personally identifiable information.

Stuff like this keeps on happening with Darrell Issa. He makes a sweeping allegation of malfeasance, and the claim proves to be incorrect. It happens often enough that the default position should be to assume that he’s lying. Yet all too often, media outlets regurgitate his garbage.

It’s easy to see why Issa would lie: It’s great politics for him. But reporters shouldn’t enable him, no matter how many clicks it buys them.


Tweet of the Day

Really small children are essentially Randian by ideology
@AdamSerwer


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Posted in Liberal Thoughts

Black Friday Weekend Slows Down as Allure Fades

NEW YORK (AP) — Black Friday fatigue is setting in. Overall, 133.7 million people shopped in stores and online over the four-day weekend, down 5.2 percent from last year, according to a survey of 4,631 people conducted by Prosper Insights & A…

Posted in Conservative thoughts

Obama To Host Meetings on Ferguson Riots

President Barack Obama is scheduled to meet on Monday with Vice President Joe Biden, his Cabinet, civil rights leaders, and law enforcement officials among others, to discuss the the civil unrest that happened in Ferguson, Missouri.  Riots were s…

Posted in Conservative thoughts

NAACP Begins Seven-Day, 120-Mile March from Ferguson to Missouri State Capital

The NAACP—disappointed Officer Darren Wilson was not indicted for the death of Michael Brown despite the evidence exonerating him—has organized and initiated a seven-day, 120-mile march called the “Journey for Justice” from…

Posted in Conservative thoughts

Deval Patrick: Indictment, Trial Would Have Been ‘Good for the Community’

On Sunday, Gov. Deval Patrick (D-MA) added his voice to the criticism over the Ferguson grand jury decision not to incident a city police officer for the August shooting of a local teenager. Without having any facts of the case at hand, Patrick says th…

Posted in Conservative thoughts

Obama’s Five Stages of Grief

Have you ever heard of the Kübler-Ross model? You might have, but you probably know it by its more common name, The Five Stages of Grief. These are generally accepted stages

The post Obama’s Five Stages of Grief appeared first on RedState.

Posted in Uncategorized

U.S. Air Base in South Korea Under Lockdown Amid Reports of Active Shooter at Base High School (UPDATE: Lockdown Lifted; Precaution After Unscheduled ‘Shooter Drill,’ Principal Says)

“Lockdown, lockdown, lockdown. Seek safety and shelter.”

Posted in Conservative thoughts